House Calendar

MOTION TO RECONSIDER

Bill Number Bill Description
1. HB 551
Bad Policy
'Mississippi Seafood Marketing Law of 2020'; enact to require consumer notice and labeling of country of origin on all foreign and imported seafood.
Analysis: This bill provides for needless government overregulation on a market that is already sufficiently regulated by the FDA. This legislation also authorizes the state government to enter the premises of seafood distributors without any court action and forcibly seize their products for the purposes of testing; all of this in the name of ensuring proper labeling that is already required by the Food and Drug Administration. This legislation provides yet another way for the state government to waste taxpayer dollars in the faux pursuit of "consumer protection".
2. HB 97
Bad Policy
Sell of urine; prohibit and prescribe criminal penalties for violation of.
Analysis: This bill outlaws the sale or distribution of real or synthetic urine for the purpose of affecting the results of a drug test. Penalties of a $1,000 fine and 6 months imprisonment are included. Attempting to cheat a government-administered drug test is already a crime, the crime should belong to the person responsible for the wrongdoing, not anybody who the state deems is loosely-connected with the crime.

RULES

Bill Number Bill Description
1. HR 10
Resolution
Mr. J.D. Burchfield; commend service as World War II veteran and congratulate on the occasion of his 98th birthday.
Analysis:

APPROPRIATIONS

Bill Number Bill Description
1. HB 127
Not Rated
Budget process; bring forward various sections relating to.
Analysis:
2. HB 263
Bad Policy
School attendance officers; clarify salaries of.
Analysis: This bill raises the salaries of school attendance officers. Raising the salaries of school officials is not a prudent solution to repairing the state of our public education. There are a myriad of needs present in our public education system, higher salaries for school administrators is not one of them.
3. HB 264
Bad Policy
Mississippi Highway Safety Patrol officers and Mississippi Bureau of Narcotics officers; clarify salaries of.
Analysis: This bill raises the salaries for all officers of the Mississippi Highway Safety Patrol and the Mississippi Bureau of Narcotics. Every Mississippian has a taxpayer burden of over $11,000 and the state is currently attempting to foot a $14 Billion bill with around $5.7 Billion of assets. The financial reality of the state of Mississippi is one that was reached through reckless government and needless pay increases for government workers. With these numbers in mind it is hard to imagine a legitimate justification for further raising the salaries of government workers.
4. HB 524
Neutral
Disaster Assistance Trust Fund; expand uses of and increase maximum amount that may be transferred to.
Analysis: This bill authorizes two more possible uses for the Disaster Assistance Trust Fund and increases the maximum amount that may be transferred to that fund from the reserve fund during one fiscal year from $1 Million to $2 Million.
5. HB 954
Neutral
ABC Division officers; compensation shall be determined by special plan approved by Personnel Board.
Analysis: This bill changes the device through which the amount of compensation received by officers of the Alcoholic Beverage Control Division and the Department of Revenue shall be determined. The amount of compensation will be determined by the State Personnel Board through a special plan that takes into account the cost of travel for these officers.

WAYS AND MEANS

Bill Number Bill Description
1. HB 46
Neutral
Bonds; revise purposes for which bonds authorized for Town of Wesson may be used.
Analysis: This bill included the construction of a new police station among the allowable uses for funds from the "2019 Town of Wesson Police Station Construction Fund".
2. HB 379
Bad Policy
Mississippi Marketplace Facilitator Act of 2020; create.
Analysis: This bill authorizes the state to tax, regulate and audit online "marketplace facilitators" (companies that facilitate the online buying and selling of personal property). It also includes a provision that allows this tax to be passed on to those who purchase items through the facilitator. This bill is an attempt by the state government to become involved in the growing online market of personal property. This state involvement in these online marketplaces will surely raise costs in this marketplace and make these online facilitators less inclined to operate with potential sellers/buyers in Mississippi.

GENERAL

Bill Number Bill Description
1. HB 322
Good Policy
Veterans; establish a permissive preference in private employment for certain veterans.
Analysis: This bill protects businesses who wish to give preference to honorably discharged veterans, unremarried widows of deceased honorably discharged veterans who died in the line of duty, and spouses of people with total disabilities when hiring. As a general rule the government should not be regulating who private businesses should or should not hire. However, businesses being allowed to give preference to a certain group of potential employees is integral to their freedom and this bill protects that albeit under a narrow set of circumstances.
2. HB 262
Bad Policy
E-verify program; transfer responsibility of administering to the Commission of Agriculture and Commerce.
Analysis: This bill is a regulatory change transferring ownership of the E-verify program from the Department of Employment Security to the Department of Agriculture. The bigger issue is the E-verify program itself. It has been proven to be unreliable at its purpose, technical glitches can keep legal employees out of jobs, and it turns our state into a permission society, where we must receive government permission to work. The bill also included penalties for businesses whose E-verify reporting show inconsistencies. This unjustly transfers the responsibility of policing immigration from the state to Mississippi's businesses.
3. HB 31
Good Policy
Mississippi Public Records Act; revise certain provisions of.
Analysis: This bill requires the Mississippi Ethics Commission to intervene when a public official appeals an otherwise successful records request; and levies a fine on public employees that either wrongly deny a records request or overcharge for a records request. Both of these changes protect the legitimacy of the records request process by making it more difficult for the government or government officials to block a request.
4. HB 531
Neutral
Counties and municipalities; encourage to exchange information with military installations relating to land use and development.
Analysis: This bill encourages counties and municipalities to coordinate more closely with military installations in the state for zoning purposes.
5. HB 282
Good Policy
Golf carts and low-speed vehicles; allow municipalities to authorize operation on municipal streets.
Analysis: This bill authorizes local municipalities to be the sole deciders on road permits for Golf carts and low-speed vehicles in their jurisdiction. Decentralization of authority on trivial matters such as permits for golf carts and other low-speed vehicles is prudent as local government is typically more equipped to handle these local issues.
6. HB 750
Good Policy
Mississippi Public Records Act of 1983; exempt certain records of Workers' Compensation Commission from definition of public records.
Analysis: This bill exempts any records of the Mississippi Worker's Compensation Commission that include personal, private or identifying information of any person from the definition of "public records". Filing a workman's compensation claim should not subject someone to having their personal information included in the public record.
7. HB 1018
Neutral
Church Protection Act; revise how a church is required to maintain reords of its security team.
Analysis: This bill requires churches to maintain the identification numbers of any law enforcement officers who are members of the church's registered security team.
8. HB 1024
Good Policy
Habitual offender; revise penalties for.
Analysis: This bill enacts sentencing reforms that limit the application of long prison sentences under Mississippi’s “three strikes” habitual law for nonviolent drug offenses. Rehabilitation and return of non-violent offenders to society keeps the taxpayer from footing an even more costly bill for the state's justice system, puts more fathers back into what would be fatherless homes, and helps solve the current crisis of prison-overcrowding.
9. HB 429
Good Policy
Nonadjudication and pretrial intervention; authorize completion of workforce training as a condition that the court may impose.
Analysis: This bill authorizes the successful completion of a workforce training program to be counted as a stipulation in a pre-trial agreement. Completion of a workforce training program is ultimately a better solution for some would-be criminals than jail/prison.
10. HB 782
Good Policy
Certificate of rehabilitation; authorize those convicted in another state to apply for a.
Analysis: This bill authorizes Mississippi inmates who were convicted of felonies out of state to apply for certificates of rehabilitation in Mississippi. These certificates will be easier to obtain for these inmates with the change offered in this legislation.
11. HB 230
Neutral
Daylight saving time; observe year-round if federal law is amended to allow it.
Analysis: This bill stipulates that if the United States Congress authorizes states to observe daylight saving time year-round, Mississippi will do so.
12. HB 217
Bad Policy
Open container of alcohol; create offense for.
Analysis: This bill creates an "open container law" that holds that the operator (driver) of any motor vehicle is to be considered "in possession" of any open container found in the vehicle, even of the open container is physically in the possession of someone else in the passenger seat. This is an affront to personal liberty and carries with it a minimum fine of $100.
13. HB 942
Neutral
Voyeurism; revise penalty for offense of.
Analysis: As it stands 5 years jail time is the maximum amount of jail time someone 21 years old or older who is convicted of voyeurism can receive. This bill lowers that standard to 18 years of age.
14. HB 943
Neutral
Terroristic threats; revise provisions regulating.
Analysis: This bill revises the language that defines the crime of committing "terroristic threats". It removes the stipulation that the crime must include a "cede to the person's demands."
15. HB 945
Neutral
Sexual battery; remove statute of limitations for prosecution of crime of.
Analysis: As it stands there is no statute of limitation for sexual battery against children. This bill removes the statute of limitations that exists for all sexual batteries, regardless of age.
16. HB 373
Neutral
Conditional medical release; prohibit offenders convicted of capital murder from receiving.
Analysis: This bill removes the right of those convicted of capital murder to be placed on conditional medical release.
17. HB 445
Neutral
State veterans nursing homes; authorize to operate group purchasing programs jointly with other public entities.
Analysis: This bill authorizes state veterans nursing homes to participate in group purchasing programs with other public entities.
18. HB 768
Neutral
Mississippi Board of Mental Health; authorize to sell certain state-owned real property located in Meridian, Lauderdale County, MS.
Analysis: This bill authorizes the Mississippi Board of Mental Health to sell the state-owned property that used to be the Old Friendship Center in Meridian.
19. HB 1016
Not Rated
Unused ballots; provide for the retention and destruction of.
Analysis:
20. HB 824
Bad Policy
Election commissioners; authorize per diem for primary and runoff election days in addition to general and special election days.
Analysis: This bill authorizes per diem pay to election commissioners on the days of primary and runoff elections. This expenditure solves no existing problem in the election process and only serves to increase the tax burden on the people of Mississippi.
21. HB 993
Good Policy
Elections; provide penalties for persons who publish campaign materials without certain identifying information.
Analysis: This bill establishes a set of penalties for any candidate, political committee or other political actor that fails to clearly identify required information in campaign publications. Information such as who paid for a political publication, who endorses or approves of the publication and who produced the publication is vital information to the voter and it's inclusion on all printed and online campaign material helps keep our elections fair and democratic.
22. HB 708
Not Rated
Pharmacy Benefit Prompt Pay Act; revise various provisions of.
Analysis:
23. HB 94
Not Rated
Center for Rural Health Innovation; establish to provide services and resources to rural hospitals.
Analysis:
24. HB 96
Good Policy
Emergency medical services provider; include fire stations and ambulances in definition under Baby Drop-off Law.
Analysis: This bill changes the definition of "emergency medical services provider" to included fire stations and ambulances that are staffed with full time firefighters or emergency medical personnel. This effectively adds fire stations and staffed ambulances to the list of authorized locations under the "baby drop-off" law. The purpose of this is to increase the number of authorized and monitored locations that a child 3 days or under can be left in order to avoid abandonment of these infants somewhere other than a monitored area.
25. HB 414
Not Rated
Anatomical gifts; prohibit discrimination against recipient based on disability.
Analysis:
26. HB 686
Good Policy
Patient's Right to Informed Health Care Choices Act & prohibitions against deceptive advertising by providers; extend repealers on.
Analysis: This bill continues the repeal of penalties included in the Patient's Right to Informed Health Care Choices Act. As it stands, all penalties under this act are repealed, this bill extends that repeal until 2023. Government penalties for improper advertising erode personal responsibility and heighten the role of government in our daily lives. Being an informed consumer of goods and services in the modern world with services like Yelp and others is not difficult and we do not need the state to belittle it's citizens with an act that acts as if citizens are simply not smart enough to make these decisions on their own. Arbitrary penalties for doctors and other medical professionals that may occasionally fail to meet the government's often rigorous advertising standards only serve to provide one more way government can take money from the small businesses in the medical field and use it to fund the next needless government expenditure.
27. HB 688
Not Rated
MS Pharmacy Practice Act; extend repealer on.
Analysis:
28. HB 777
Not Rated
Counselors; revise certain provisions of licensing laws.
Analysis:
29. HB 984
Not Rated
Mississippi Board of Nursing; revise the notice required for special meeting of.
Analysis:
30. HB 117
Good Policy
Water well contractor's license; remove requirement that applicant must present three affidavits to the DEQ examining committee.
Analysis: This bill removes a requirement that stipulates that three affidavits must be submitted to the DEQ Examining Committee for the successful application for a Water Well Contractor's license. This removes an unnecessary hurdle that those seeking gainful employment in the Water Well Contractor's field must overcome. The state should be in the business of making it easier to attain employment, not more difficult, and this bill does that by removing arbitrary licensing requirements.